was successfully added to your cart.

Subscribe to our newsletter

& get a copy of our new e-book
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

How an ADD Assessment Tool for Adults Works

Are you struggling with organization? Constantly running late? Having difficulty managing your money and personal relationships? You may have ADD or ADHD, the good news is that there are a myriad of tests for adults designed to help you determine whether or not you could potentially have one of these conditions. All tests are not created equal though, it is important that you choose one from a reputable source such as Additude Magazine or Open Forest.

A quick test result is not definitive

It is equally important that you understand that these types of tests are not definitive when it comes to diagnosing ADD or ADHD. They are designed rather as a means for you to determine if you might have one of these conditions. It is always important that you seek the opinion of a medical professional if you are having concerns about any mental or physical condition you may be experiencing.

That being said tests like the one found here are a great means of “initial detection” where it concerns ADD or ADHD. These tests are based on the same checklist of symptoms that a medical professional would go over with you if you were undergoing a consultation, thus pointing out warning signes of ADHD. By the way of a few simple questions (most consisting of 10-14) these tests can help you determine if you are experiencing symptoms that are classically associated with ADD or ADHD. What the tests lack though is the intuition that comes with years of experience that a practicing mental health professional will have.

Consult a professional

That is why it is important that if you take one of these tests (and determine that you may have one of the conditions) you then consult a professional. They are going to be able to determine definitively whether you have ADD or if it is perhaps something else entirely.

More on: ADHD, Adult Mental Health Care
Latest update: July 12, 2016